Category Archives: information

Flood 2018

The Kettle River Watershed Authority has been heavily involved with the 2018 Flood Response.

Click here to see the latest Flood Update

 

The Kettle River peaked last night at 60 centimetres over record levels first set in 1948

 

Click here to see all flood information on the RDKB website.

Flooding between Grand Forks and Christina Lake

 

Fishing Regulations Reminder for the Kettle, West Kettle, and the Granby Rivers

Is it possible to have a Flood and drought in the same year? Yes.  Absolutely. As we know, the lack of rain in the boundary has created drought like conditions.  That said, drought restrictions from the province have not yet been put in place for this area.  The Kettle, the West Kettle and the Granby rivers, however, are all on the provincial watch list which means that they are being closely monitored and water restrictions could still be enforced this fall.

A major concern that the province has is fish kills and the long-term sustainability of fish populations.  Rainbow trout have been studied over multiple years and the fishery has deteriorated.  Findings conclude that fewer and smaller rainbow trout are found throughout boundary rivers.  Causes include decreased habitat for the fish, decreases in flow, increases in water temperatures, and overfishing.  As a result of fish population studies, more stringent fishing regulations were put in place in 2015 for rainbow trout.  In summary: fishing in the Kettle and West Kettle is catch and release only, no fishing from July 25 and August 25 and a live bait ban from Apr. 1 – Oct. 31.  In the Granby upstream of Burrell Creek, the bait ban is from Apr. 1-Oct. 31 with a daily limit of 1 trout.  Downstream of Burrell Creek, catch and release only and a bait ban from July 1 – Oct. 31.  These new regulations are designed to ensure future generations are afforded the same recreational opportunities that we enjoy and appreciate today.

Shawn Lockhart releasing rainbow back to the river (Credit Shawn Lockhart)Shawn Lockhart releasing rainbow back to the river (Credit Shawn Lockhart).

Click Fishing Regulations to obtain the most up to date regulations for the boundary region.  Alternatively a hard copy can be obtained at Service  BC.

– Jessica Mace is the coordinator of the Kettle River Watershed Management Plan for the RDKB, and is working with the Kettle River Watershed Authority to implement recommendations from the plan. Email plan@kettleriver.ca

Flooding – Boundary Region, BC

 

There has been major flooding in the Boundary Region. The Kettle River Watershed Authority’s key messages are:

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City Park – Grand Forks, BC May 6, 2017 (courtesy of Leif Churchill)

1. River bank instability – Avoid the water’s edge since the banks are over saturated and are compromised. In the town of Cashe Creek near Kamloops, a fire chief went missing on Friday morning after checking water levels in a flooded area.  Click on Cache Creek to read  more.

2. Water Levels – Although the water levels have receded over the past 24 hours, there is a risk that levels will rise again later this week.  See river level forecasts posted on the Regional District of the Kootenay Boundary (RDKB) site at  RDKB.  There is an emergency response team set up  at the RDKB office in Grand Forks. If you have any questions/concerns you can contact the response team by calling 1-888-747-9119 or 250-442-3628.

3. Flood preparation – The RDKB emergency response team has recommended some steps to take for flood preparation.  Go to this link for more information – Flood Preparation

4. Water contamination – Floodwater is not river water.  Avoid playing in or drinking the flood water since the water may be contaminated.  Go to this link for more information – Floodwater

 

New USDA research note on protecting headwater streams

More and more science is finding the importance of protecting headwater streams for aquatic ecosystem health, biodiversity, and downstream water quality and drinking water protection. In this research note, USDA Forest Service ecologists examined the effect of variable-width buffers greater than 50 ft (15.24 m) on non-fish-bearing streams. This has implications for improving stream protection in our active forestry areas, where there is very little protection for small streams and wetlands.

From: http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/49761:

Since the Northwest Forest Plan implemented riparian buffers along non-fish bearing streams in 1994, there have been questions about how wide those buffers need to be to protect aquatic and riparian resources from upland forest management activities. The Density Management and Riparian Buffer Study of western Oregon, also initiated in 1994, examines the effects of thinning and different buffer widths on aquatic and riparian vertebrates and habitats, tree growth, and vegetation along headwater streams.

Dede Olson, a research ecologist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station, leads the riparian component of the study. Olson and her colleagues found that aquatic and riparian species and habitat were retained with no-entry, 50-foot minimum variable-width buffers.
Their research has characterized both aquatic and terrestrial amphibian assemblages that rely on headwater streams and near-stream riparian forest habitats. For example, they documented that terrestrial salamanders have heightened movements within 50 feet of headwater streams. By extending such buffers along headwater streams over ridgelines, landscape connectivity could be provided, enabling gene flow among populations of terrestrial salamanders.

Scientists found that thinning upslope accelerated growth of trees within the buffer within 50 feet from the thinned edge. Larger trees ultimately lead to larger pieces of down wood, which form critical habitat both on land and in streams